Long term benefits of hypnotherapy for irritable bowel syndrome.

Gonsalkorale WM, Miller V, Afzal A, Whorwell PJ.

Gut. 2003

In this study, 204 IBS patients treated with a course of hypnotherapy completed questionnaires about symptoms, quality of life, anxiety, and depression before, immediately after, and up to six years following the treatment. Of all the treated patients, 71% showed improvement in response to treatment initially, and of those, 81% were still fully improved when re-contacted up to five years later. Quality of life and anxiety or depression scores were also still significantly improved at follow-up but showed some deterioration. Patients also reported fewer doctor visits rates and less medication use long-term after hypnosis treatment. These results indicate that for most patients the benefits from hypnotherapy last at least five years. 


Effect of nurse-led gut-directed hypnotherapy upon health-related quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

Smith GD et al.J Clin Nurs. 2006

This study conducted in Edinburgh, UK, measured the effects of a nurse-led gut-directed hypnotherapy on IBS. Seventy-five patients were treated with 5 to 7 1/2 hours of hypnotherapy, as well as receiving education and support. Diary results showed that the physical symptoms of abdominal pain and bloating improved significantly after treatment. Significant improvement was also found after treatment in anxiety scores and in six out of eight health-related quality of life scores. 


Psychological Interventions for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

Ballou & Keefer.

Clin Gastroenterology. 2017.

Psychological interventions have been designed and implemented effectively in a wide range of medical conditions, including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). The psychological treatments for IBS and IBD with the strongest evidence base include: cognitive behavioural therapy, hypnosis, and mindfulness-based therapies. The evidence for each of these therapies is reviewed here for both IBS and IBD. In general, there is a stronger and larger evidence base to support the use of psychological interventions in IBS compared with IBD. This is likely due to the high level of psychiatric comorbidity associated with IBS and the involvement of the stress-response in symptom presentation of IBS. 


Effects of gut-directed hypnotherapy on IBS in different clinical settings-results from two randomized, controlled trials.

Lindfors et al. Am J Gastroenterology. 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This pair of controlled research trials in Sweden investigated the effects of 12 sessions of gut-directed hypnotherapy for IBS in two different clinical settings. In study one, 90 patients were randomly assigned to receive either hypnotherapy or supportive therapy in psychology private practices, whereas in the second study 48 patients were randomly assigned to either gut-directed hypnotherapy or a waiting list in a small county hospital. Gastrointestinal symptom severity and quality of life were evaluated at baseline, at 3 months follow-up and after 1 year. In both the studies, IBS-related symptoms were improved at 3 months in the hypnosis groups but not in the control groups. In study 1, hypnosis produced a significantly greater improvement in IBS symptom severity than in the control group (P<0.05), and a trend in the same direction was seen in study 2. The benefits from hypnosis treatment seen at 3 months were sustained up to 1 year. 


 

Psychological Interventions for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

Ballou & Keefer.

Clin Gastroenterology. 2017.

Psychological interventions have been designed and implemented effectively in a wide range of medical conditions, including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). The psychological treatments for IBS and IBD with the strongest evidence base include: cognitive behavioural therapy, hypnosis, and mindfulness-based therapies. The evidence for each of these therapies is reviewed here for both IBS and IBD. In general, there is a stronger and larger evidence base to support the use of psychological interventions in IBS compared with IBD. This is likely due to the high level of psychiatric comorbidity associated with IBS and the involvement of the stress-response in symptom presentation of IBS.